Birth

Consular Report of Birth Abroad

As U.S. citizen parent(s), you should report your child’s birth abroad as soon as possible to the U.S. Consulate to establish an official record of the child’s claim to U.S. citizenship at birth. The official record will be the Consular Report of Birth Abroad, Form FS-240 which is a basic United States citizenship document.

Children born abroad may acquire U.S. citizenship at birth only if at least one of the natural parents were U.S. citizens at the time of the child’s birth. The exact requirements vary depending on the date of the child’s birth, the marital status of the parents, and which parent (if not both) was a U.S. citizen.

Follow this link for important information for U.S. citizens considering the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) abroad.

The birth of a child abroad to U.S. citizen parent(s) should be reported as soon as possible so that a Consular Report of Birth Abroad can be issued as an official record of the child’s claim to U.S. citizenship:

  • A Consular Report of Birth can only be created at a U.S. Consular Office overseas while the child is under age 18.
  • Following a certain procedure, you may replace, amend or request multiple copies of a Consular Report of Birth at any time.

Apply for the Consular Report of Birth Abroad for your child

Prepare the following documents:

  • Completed (but not signed) application Form DS-2029 Application for Consular Report of Birth Abroad (PDF-104 KB)  – all questions must be answered;
  • Child’s original Estonian birth certificate translated into English;
  • The parents marriage certificate (if applicable);
  • Evidence of termination of each parent’s previous marriages (if applicable);
  • Evidence of the U.S. citizen parent’s residence in the United States prior to the birth of the child.

In some cases, the consular officer may also ask for additional documentation related to the parents’ life together, the pregnancy, and the child’s birth and subsequent development.  This might include pre- and post-natal medical records, and family photos documenting the mother’s pregnancy, the parents’ wedding ceremony, and the child’s relationship with his or her parents from date of birth to the present.

Under circumstances when no other form of credible evidence of paternity/maternity is available, genetic (DNA) testing may be used for verifying an alleged biological relationship. Such testing is entirely voluntary, must be done in accordance with the U.S. Department of State instructions, and all costs of testing and related expenses must be borne by the family.

An interview is conducted before a U.S. Consular Report of Birth Abroad can be issued. Both the child and the parent(s) are required to be present at the interview.

The application fee for this document is $100.00 or the equivalent in Euro to be paid at the Consular Section in cash or by credit card.

If a determination is made that the child acquired U.S. citizenship at birth, you will be issued a Consular Report of Birth Abroad of a Citizen of the United States of America for your child. This document is recognized by U.S. law as a proof of acquisition of U.S. citizenship and is acceptable evidence of citizenship for obtaining a passport, entering school, and most other purposes.

Applicants seeking to register the birth of an American Child, and obtain a passport for that child, are required to make an appointment with the Consular Section.

To make an appointment please click here.

For emergency ACS services, please call 66 88 128 or send an email to ACSTallinn@state.gov

This page provides information only for U.S. citizens who wish to obtain a citizenship document and first-time passport for a child born in Estonia.  (If you wish to obtain a first-time passport for a child born in the United States, or for a child born in another country other than Estonia, please contact the Consular Section for more information).

Before a first-time passport can be issued to a child born in Estonia to an American parent, the Consul must determine whether the child is a U.S. citizen from birth.  If so, the child can be issued a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (Form FS-240), which is a certificate stating that the child is a U.S. citizen from birth, even though he/she was born outside of the United States.  The fee for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad is $100, payable at the time you visit the Consular Section, which can be paid in cash U.S. dollars, the cash equivalent in Euro, or with certain credit cards.  If the parents also wish to obtain a first-time passport as well, the cost of the child’s passport is an additional $115.

To apply for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, both parents should come in person with the child. (See below if one parent must be absent.)

Please present the following items:

  • Completed Form DS-2029 (PDF 104 KB).  Please do not sign the form until instructed to do so by the Consul.
  • Child’s original Estonian birth certificate translated into English.  (The English version can be obtained at the Office of Vital Statistics (Perekonnaseisuamet). We will make copies and return the original to you).
  • Passports for both parents. An American parent who is a dual national must present a U.S. passport.
  • Proof of the parents’ relationship prior to the child’s conception, such as a marriage certificate or a previous child’s birth certificate.
  • The Consul may ask for additional evidence of the birth, such as pre-natal records and hospital records.
  • In some cases evidence of the U.S. citizen parent’s residence in the United States prior to the birth of the child.

To apply for a passport as well, also please present the following additional items:

  • DS-11: Application for a U.S. Passport. Blank (PDF 98 KB).   Complete Online.
  • Please do not sign the form until instructed to do so by the Consul.
  • One passport photo (no more than 6 months old), 2 inches (5 cm) square with a white background. The child should have eyes open looking straight at the camera.
  • If the child has an Estonian (or other) passport, please bring it for identification purposes.
  • If one parent cannot be present, a signed & notarized Form DS-3053 accompanied by photocopy of absent parent’s photo ID with signature must be brought to the Consul.
  • If one parent has sole legal custody, or the absent parent is not available due to death, disappearance, etc., please contact the Consular Section to address the matter with the Consul.

Please read more information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Where to Write for Vital Records.

Transmission of U.S. citizenship depends on:

  1. At least one parent having the nationality of the United States at the time of the child’s birth;
  2. The existence of a blood relationship between the child and U.S. citizen parent(s);
  3. Documentary evidence demonstrating the U.S. citizen parent(s)’ presence in the United States prior to the child’s birth, as specified in the Transmission Requirements Table below.

Examples of Documentation

Some examples of documentary evidence which may be considered to demonstrate that physical presence requirements have been met may include (but are not limited to):

  • Wage and tax statements (W-2)
  • Academic transcripts
  • Employment records
  • Rental receipts
  • Records of honorable U.S. military service, employment with U.S. Government or certain intergovernmental international organizations; or as a dependent, unmarried child and member of the household of a parent in such service or employment (except where indicated).
  • U.S. passport stamps may be considered a part of the evidence submitted, but should not be the sole documentary evidence. Drivers’ licenses do not constitute evidence of physical presence.

If you have other children who have been issued with a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, this may be considered as supplemental evidence. Please also read important information regarding Supporting Documents.