Notarial Services

The U.S. Embassy in Tallinn assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the entities or individuals whose names appear on the following lists. Inclusion on this list is in no way an endorsement by the Department or the U.S. government. Names are listed alphabetically, and the order in which they appear has no other significance. The information on the list is provided directly by the local service providers; the Department is not in a position to vouch for such information.

U.S. citizens and foreign nationals doing business with U.S. citizens and/or corporations often require the services of a U.S. notary public. The Embassy provides notarial services to citizens and non-citizens alike. Those seeking notarial services are strongly encouraged to make an appointment with the Consular Section to ensure that we can serve you promptly. Photo identification with signature (e.g., passport, driver’s license, etc.) is required. If the document also requires witnesses, you must bring your own witnesses, each of whom should present identification. If you will be signing on behalf of another entity (e.g., as an officer or director of a corporation), you should bring proof (e.g., corporate minutes) proving that you are authorized to sign on behalf of the entity.

Please read the Department of State’s general information on the types of notarial services provided at U.S. embassies and consulates overseas. The fee for notarial services is $50 for each signature to be notarized. Fees may be paid in cash dollars, the cash equivalent in Euro, or with certain credit cards.

The Embassy also can make certified true copies of documents for use in the United States. For example, the Embassy can make a certificate true copy of an Estonian citizen’s passport for submission with Form W-7 to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service in order to obtain an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN). Persons seeking to authenticate a U.S. document should read our instructions on how to authenticate a U.S. document for use in Estonia.

Other Judicial Services

The Consular Section provides other judicial services in civil matters, in addition to notarial services. For example, the Consular Section provides assistance for issues relating to service of process in Estonia, taking a deposition of a person in Estonia, or other matters relating to a civil judicial matter in the United States. Please contact the Consular Section to discuss what services can be provided for your specific matter, and the fees for such services. You may also read the U.S. Department of State’s general information on judicial services.

Cooperation on criminal matters is governed by specific agreements between the government of the United States and the government of Estonia.

Authentication of an Estonian Document for use in the United States

Estonia and the United States are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention (also known as the Hague Legalization Convention). Accordingly, in order to authenticate (or “legalize”) a document issued by a governmental entity in Estonia for use in the United States, you must obtain an “apostille” from the Estonian government. Effective January 1, 2010, all Estonian notaries are empowered issue apostilles for Estonian public documents. To find an Estonian notary, please see http://www.notar.ee/. Please also read the U.S. Department of State’s explanation of apostilles.

Authentication of a U.S. Document for use in Estonia

Estonia and the United States are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention (also known as the Hague Legalization Convention). Accordingly, in order to authenticate (or “legalize”) a document issued by a governmental entity in the United States for use in Estonia, you must obtain an “apostille” from the state where the document was issued (or from a federal office for certain documents issued by the U.S. federal government). The U.S. Embassy does not issue apostilles. Please read the U.S. Department of State’s explanation of apostilles.

In many countries, there is one office that issues all apostilles for that country. In the United States, however, each state issues apostilles for its own documents. Thus, for example, a California birth certificate must be authenticated with an apostille issued by the state of California. Similarly, an Illinois marriage certificate must be authenticated by an apostille issued by the state of Illinois. Each state maintains its own website explaining how to obtain an apostille from that state (easily found using standard search engines on the internet). Please also see the list of the state (and federal) authentication authorities in the United States.